Kansas City Airports

The Kansas City metropolitan area is served by several airports. It is primarily served by Kansas City International Airport, located 15 miles northwest of downtown Kansas City, Missouri, was built to serve as a world hub for the supersonic transport and Boeing 747. The airport’s gates were positioned 100 feet (30 m) from the street; however, since the September 11, 2001 attacks, these have undergone expensive overhauls, retrofitting it to incorporate elements of conventional security systems.

The much smaller Charles B. Wheeler Downtown Airport, located to the immediate north of downtown near the Missouri River, was the original headquarters of Trans World Airlines (TWA) and houses the Airline History Museum. It served as the area’s major airport until 1972, when Kansas City International (then known as Mid-Continent International Airport and was home to an Overhaul Base for TWA) became the primary airport for the metropolitan area after undergoing $150 million in upgrades that were approved by voters in a 1966 bond issue. Downtown Airport is still used to this day for general aviation and airshows.

There are two general aviation airports in Johnson County, Kansas. New Century AirCenter borders southwest Olathe and northeast Gardner. The primary runway at New Century AirCenter is the second longest runway in the region next to those at Kansas City International Airport. It is located 7 miles from the Logistics Park Kansas City Intermodal Facility. The other airport, Johnson County Executive Airport has one runway on 500 acres and is the fourth busiest towered airport in the state of Kansas.

We shall talk about the largest airport only in detail. Kansas City International Airport (IATA: MCI, ICAO: KMCI, FAA LID: MCI) (originally Mid-Continent International Airport) is a public airport 15 miles (24 km) northwest of downtown Kansas City in Platte County, Missouri. In 2017, 11.50 million passengers used the airport.

Its largest carriers are Southwest Airlines and Delta Air Lines, both having many daily flights in Terminal B.

The airport has always been a civilian airport and has never had an Air National Guard unit assigned to it.

In 2009, the airport was reported as having the highest number of wildlife strikes of any airport in the US, based on take-offs and landings (57 per 100,000). FAA records showed 146 strikes in 2008 – up from 37 in 2000.

In 2017 Kansas City voters approved a new single-terminal design to be built by Edgemoor Infrastructure & Real Estate over the following 3–4 years. The new airport would be built over the current A Terminal, with flights continuing in terminals B and C during the construction.

Kansas City Attractions and Activities

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